carob-cookies

Carob & Sesame Cookies

There are many awesome things about carob. And I’m not talking about its taste and its nutritional benefits. The carob tree grows with no effort at all. It’s drought resistant and makes great shade in the hot summer months. It’s a perfect low-maintenance and produces the carob pods in abundance.

I like how ancient cultures used the seeds as a weight scale for gemstones and pearls. That is where the term ‘carat’ comes from.

I also like how it was an important source of nutrients in many villages in Greece throughout the occupation. Many families would have starved if it wasn’t for its availability.

Unfortunately, its own success has been the reason of its demise. After the war, carob was seen as a ‘poor man’s food’ and reminded people of the hard times. It was therefore removed from their diet and many of its trees were cut down.

Like with so many other products, it wasn’t until modern science started publishing studies that highlighted the nutritional benefits of carobs that it slowly started finding its way back in our kitchens.

The ways to use this awesome little weird pea-cousin pod are many. Below you will find a recipe that is quite ‘greeky’ in its aromas.

carob-cookies

Ingredients

  • 1.5 cups Coco oil or Olive oil
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • ½ cup orange juice
  • 1 t spoon baking soda
  • 2 t spoon baking powder
  • 1 t spoon cinnamon
  • ½ t spoon clove
  • Orange peel
  • 1 cup carob powder
  • 5 cups all purpose flour
  • 1 spoon tahini
  • Sesame seeds

Note: In this recipe we also added a cup of hemp flour but it kind of dried them out so we do’t recommend that.

Directions:

  1. Mix the coco oil, sugar and spices in a bowl and mix well but don’t allow the sugar to fully melt.
  2. Wash the orange, scrape its skin and then squeeze its juice.
  3. In one cup flour add the baking powder.
  4. Add the baking soda in the orange juice and add in the powder mix. Add the carob powder gradually. Add the tahini.
  5. Keep mixing and gradually add the remaining of the flour.
  6. Mix until the dough is soft and does not stick in your hands. Let rest for 30 minutes.
  7. Mould the dough into a cookie shape and sprinkle the sesame seeds on top.
  8. Bake in pre heated oven on 180 degrees, middle dish for 25 minutes.

Credits: Photography by Kinlake

 

  • In the south of Italy this plant is still well present and used in traditional cooking. It is a special ingredient for ice cream manufacturing as a thickener.
    I remember also well present in Thailand, as you mentioned, used from the locals to have a refreshing shade from the tropical heat.
    I am going to try this recipe soon! Thank you for sharing.